History & Aims

History & Aims

Articles of incorporation of philincon

Elaborating on Certification by the Incorporators of November / December 2010:

⋅ To help preserve biodiversity in the Philippines

⋅ To assist communities, government agencies and its offices, the private sector, individuals, POs and NGOs in designing, implementing, or sustaining progress, projects and fora that directly or indirectly support biodiversity, conservation and resource management, precautionary sustainable economic development of rural communities,  including, but not limited to, livelihood projects, reforestation and training seminars on improved agricultural techniques and forests and watershed protection and restoration. Given financial or other constraints habitat protection will be given preference to all other agenda

⋅ To conduct research on the components of biodiversity and on the interrelationships of these components in terrestrial ecosystems;

⋅ To accept donated, confiscated or rescued wildlife for the purpose of conserving, rehabilitating, releasing and/or breeding species indigenous to the Philippines, contingent on the capacity of  the rescue facilities managed under the umbrella of the NGO. Preference will be given to wildlife indigenous to Panay;

⋅ To raise funds, from both Philippine and external sources, to finance the above activities.

Our important work

Aims and Scope

To reverse the trend of destruction to the benefit of both humans and nature, severals tools must be put to use. These including a rigorous protection of the remaining environment. PhilinCon designs and implements projects, maintains research and laboratory facilities, and cooperates with local as well as national governmental agencies.

Our important work

History and work of PhilinCon

 

PhilinCon initially was run under the name Philippine Endemic Species Conservation Project (PESCP), founded by Professor Curio. Its work on Panay started in 1995 by site investigations in Negros and the Central Panay Mountains. At various locations, efforts were made to establish research facilities from which studies on the area’s fauna and flora could be conducted.

Aims and Scope

In the Philippines, growth of the population, with increasing need for land, water and food, has led to overexploitation and devastation of ecosystems. These ecosystems are not only of scientific interest (because the Philippines are one of the biodiversity hotspots worldwide), but are also vital for economy and survival of the people. Over the last few decades, destruction of Philippine nature has increased dramatically. In Mindanao, the 2011 disaster with almost 2000 inhabitants dead or missing after heavy flash floods caused by typhoon Sedong, and hundred thousands more left homeless, was partly due to deforestation of watersheds as one consequence of overpopulation and lack of protective measures. Those detrimental activities caused the water to run down the mountain too fast without being retained by forest cover. With global climate change leading to an increase in storm frequency and severity, the need for protection of the last intact ecosystems providing genetic resources for reforestation is evident.

The island of Panay is home to last largely undisturbed remnants of rainforest ecosystems (which are an essential genetic resource for reforestation in the entire Western Visayas region. To reverse the trend of destruction to the benefit of both humans and nature, several tools must be put to use- These include a rigorous protection of the remaining environment flanked by reforestation of deteriorating landscapes, specially reforestation, and efficient family planning along with an improvement of health and economic situation.

To achieve its objectives, PhilinCon designs and implements projects, maintains research and laboratory facilities, and cooperates with local as well as national governmental agencies. PhilinCon’s integrated conservation project had quickly become community-based, trying to provide alternative livelihoods to rural families, in order to diminish the need for unsustainable use of forest products and illegal hunting of wildlife. PhilinCon cooperates with the DENR, barangay councils and established Community Conservationists. In addition, PhilinCon pays the salary and health insurances for local forest rangers who supporting the law enforcement agencies in quest to stop illegal logging and poaching. Further, it is engaged in in situ protection of threatened wildlife by measures against poaching and illegal wildlife trade, and by maintaining a facility for rehabilitation and release of threatened animals. The organization’s conservation efforts focus on the NW Panay Peninsula where the last highly threatened stand of low-elevation forest had been discovered by our staff. Our work also includes preserving the endangered Walden’s Hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus waldeni; local name: dulungan), and other endangered, ecologically important wildlife.

Due to our advocacy the Panay peninsula was declared Protected Area by the President of the Philippines in 2001. From 2000 on, we also got increasingly involved in the protection of forests in the Central Panay Mountain Range (CPMR). The mountain range is important for the regional climate and water supply and home to remnant populations of endangered endemic species including hornbills, Visayan spotted deer, cloud rat, Visayan warty pig and the Mabitang, a large arboricolous monitor lizard species described by PhilinCon coworkers in 2001. Plants in the region include Rafflesia labata and many rare orchid species. In 2008, the Central Office of the DENR, instructed the Executive Director of Regional DENR region 6 (Western Visayas) to designate the area as ‘Critical Habitat’ under the Wildlife Conservation and Protection Act. PhilinCon was entrusted with the task to help assessing the invaluable flora and fauna of these mountain forests. In the process, the team of PhilinCon under scientific supervision of Prof. E. Curio was conducting surveys and taxonomic research.

History and work of PhilinCon

PhilinCon had been initially run under the name Philippine Endemic Species Conservation Project (PESCP), founded by Professor Curio. Its work on Panay started in 1995 by site investigations in Negros and the Central Panay Mountains. Faunistic and floristic surveys were conducted, but the logistics of performing these tasks in that area proved beyond the means of the project at that time. With the discovery of significant stands of low-elevation rain forest in the NW Panay peninsula, including a variety of endangered, endemic species of plants and animals, the PESCP relocated its main operations to this area. From now on, the project focused on the overall conservation of the natural resource base of the peninsula, while maintaining interest and linkages in Central Panay. From 2005 on, the NGO PhilConserve (Philippine Association for Conservation and Development, Inc.) acted as an umbrella organization for the project.

From its inception, the Frankfurt Zoological Society was backing the project activities, being primarily interested in preserving the highly endangered Writhed-billed Hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus waldeni; local name: dulungan) and its habitat. With the remnant population of this species and other endangered wildlife living in the Central Panay Mountain Range (CPMR), the emphasis of conservation work was extended back to this area from 2000 onwards. Field work became community-based, aiming at the precautionary development of the up-land communities.

In 2011, the PESCP was replaced with PanayCon, its functional successor, with nature conservation work continued, but with additional focus on cooperation with and help for the local people. 

Because of discrepancies concerning by-laws, in Nov 2010 conservation minded citizens of larger Pandan, Antique, established the new NGO PhilinCon, running conservation work and research. PhilinCon took over PhilConserve’s linkages with the LGUs (Local Government Units) and the DENR, and from 2017 on became the only name of both project and NGO: the ‘Philippine Initiative for Environmental Conservation’. PhilinCon is currently being restructured whilst adhering to the core goals as before (see above).